• header2
  • header1

A plan to reverse the growing nastiness trend

A plan to reverse the growing nastiness trend

womensmarchjlr0963.jpg.size.custom.crop.1086x663Thousands of women and girls and their families took to the streets of Toronto last month to protest Donald Trump and show of solidarity for women's and human rights. "The inauguration of Donald Trump was met with the largest outpouring of anger in living memory," writes John Cartwright. (JIM RANKIN / TORONTO STAR)

In our increasingly troubled times people may feel overwhelmed unless they see inspiring and effective response.

Across the country, we mourn the tragic loss of life of six of our fellow Canadians gunned down because of their religion in a mosque Sainte-Foy, Que. The murder by a white supremacist fuelled by the Islamophobia of Marie Le Pen and Donald Trump stands as a shocking notice of what is at stake in 2017 and beyond.

The inauguration of Donald Trump was met with the largest outpouring of anger in living memory. In Toronto more than 50,000 women and allies from all walks of life jammed Queen’s Park in the largest protest in decades. Many in the crowd had never been to a demonstration, while others were veteran activists dismayed at the prospect of past gains undone by a vile demagogue in the White House.

In the first month he proved the worst fears to be justified. His cabinet of billionaires representing oil and finance capital are determined to gut labour standards, public education and equality rights. Executive Orders to build a wall against Mexico, bar Muslims are conscious steps to build a climate of fear and division against people of colour and immigrants.

In Canada, the Trudeau government is positioning itself to accommodate the new reality of Trump’s America First doctrine. The cabinet was shuffled, the disgraced former PM Brian Mulroney was recruited, and the Keystone pipeline decision applauded. Business leaders are trying to position themselves for future trade relations, while oil, gas and mining interests prepare to claw back measures for carbon pricing or climate justice.

Read Full Article Here